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Marijuana Collectives Challenge Charges

Sonora, CA — Eight of the nine suspects arrested following a raid of three medicinal marijuana collectives in Tuolumne County appeared in court today before Judge Douglas Boyack.

Today’s arraignment proceedings were continued until August because attorneys for the eight plan to file a demurrer. The legal maneuver often challenges that while facts presented may be true, they do not constitute a legal basis for a lawsuit.


“The charges are lacking proper basis, and these are people who were acting in complete compliance with the medical marijuana laws of California,” says Kali Grech, Attorney for Sara Herrin of Today’s Health Collective. “The DA is refusing to recognize those laws and respect those laws.”


Grech, whose office is out of San Francisco, is hoping that the charges are dismissed. She also spoke on behalf of Jana Evans and Nancy Smith of Today’s Health Collective, who have separate attorneys that were unable to attend the court proceedings. Danny Herrin, a fourth suspect arrested from Today’s Health Collective, was represented by Bay Area attorney Gregory Bentley.


The four arrested from Foothill Care Inc. on Mono Way were represented by attorney Sarah White of Folsom. The accused are James Brisco, Jason Brisco, Renee Lynn Rivera, and Rhett Schuller.


The only other person arrested as part of the raids was Sarah Marie Jacobs of Alternative Natural Solutions in Chinese Camp. She had previously entered a plea of not guilty and did not have a court appearance scheduled today.


The demurrer for the workers of Today’s Health Collective will be heard on August 2nd in Department Three of Tuolumne County Superior Court. The demurrer from Foothill Care Inc. will be heard on August 9th. Deputy District Attorney John Hansen requested to Judge Boyack that the court dates be separated because there are various attorneys involved in the cases.


Law enforcement officials argue that the collectives were selling marijuana for profit rather than just collectively cultivating it for medicinal purposes.


To read an earlier story about the case, click here.