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Interface Decision Reissued

An area of the Stanislaus National Forest in Calaveras County, known as the interface has long been popular with dirt bikers and all-terrain vehicle riders. It´s also been the focal point of increased conflicts among trail users and nearby residents who don´t like the noise and dust the off-roaders generate.

Stanislaus National Forest Supervisor Tom Quinn has just re-issued a new decision on the Interface he had withdrawn in March.

Under the new plan more than 20 miles of existing trails and roads in the Penny Pines area would be decommissioned under the plan. “This new decision will allow for a full phase-out of off-highway vehicle use in the Penny Pines area over an 18-month period,” said Forest spokesman Jerry Synder.

According to the forest service, the interest groups worked together to come to an agreement on the controversial area off Highway 4 near Arnold.

He added those closed trails will be replaced in the higher elevation Summit level region. “During that 18 months, we´ll be creating new trails up there.” Synder said they will also be looking at other area of the forest “that might be good locations for this type of activity.”

Supervisor Quinn said in a written statement, “This decision is unlikely to fully satisfy all interested .” Quinn also commented on the cooperation between the two sides.

Other off-road users said the new plan will affect local riders more than those who come up to the Interface from outside the region and that the forest service showed a total disregard for people who live in the area.