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Update: State’s New Minimum Wage Bill To Become Law

Update at 4 p.m.: Governor Jerry Brown plans Monday to sign legislation increasing the state’s minimum wage from $10 to $15 an hour by 2022.  The move will make California the highest hourly wage payer in the nation. Brown plans to put his signature on the bill in Los Angeles. As the deal was worked out between the Governor and labor unions this past weekend, Brown stated, “California is proving once again that it can get things done and help people get ahead. This plan raises the minimum wage in a careful and responsible way and provides some flexibility if economic and budgetary conditions change.”

Update 3:10 p.m.: Within a matter of hours on Thursday California lawmakers approved the nation’s highest statewide minimum wage. Earlier, the Assembly approved the legislation that will increase it from $10 to $15 an hour by 2022. Now the Senate has also given the green light to send the bill to Governor Jerry Brown’s desk. As he worked with labor unions to hammer out this deal, his signature is expected.

Original Post at 12:54 p.m.: Sonora, CA — The California Assembly passed a plan to increase the state’s minimum wage, and it now moves to the Senate.

The proposal calls for the state’s base wage to increase to $15 by 2022. After the vote, Democratic Assembly Leader Anthony Rendon said, “We know that some who work full-time cannot put a roof over their heads or a meal on the table. Today, the California Legislature sent the strong message that if you work full-time, your family shouldn’t have to live in poverty.”

Many Republicans spoke out against the increase, arguing that employers will be forced to cut jobs. Assemblyman Jim Patterson said, “Imagine going to a beloved employee and saying ‘I have to cut your hours.’ That’s the impossible choice we are forcing on California job creators and people trying to earn a living. That impossible choice — cut hours, cut jobs or close altogether – will be made on Main Street in everyone’s hometown by hardworking, family run businesses.”

The legislation is anticipated to pass in the Senate and then be signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown.