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Mother Lode Fire Information – Living With Fire

Living with Fire Series

This series of articles, written by Bill Frost, Past Natural Resource Advisor, UC Cooperative Extension and Mark Hicks, Past Project Manager, El Dorado County Resource Conservation District, is rich with history, tips and advice. MyMotherLode.com was the source for local information during the Rim Fire and the Butte Fire. If you live in the Mother Lode or are contemplating moving here, please take the time to read each section.

Chipping and Garden Debris Disposal

For the full list of the resources for chipping and garden debris disposal, in Tuolumne and Calaveras counties. Sites include Twain Harte, Sonora, Columbia, Ponderosa Hills, Copperopolis, Milton, Valecito, and Wilseyville.

Defensible Space

Foothill residents need to work on fire proofing their properties for fire season. Additionally, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF) will be out inspecting for the law (Public Resource Code 4291) that requires fire breaks around all buildings on any mountainous or forest, brush or grass covered land. A big change occurred in this law January 1, 2005. A new section was added which increased the clearance requirements from 30 to 100 feet (or to the property line if closer).

Evacuation Plans

Some suggested check lists to help you prepare for an evacuation.

Fire Safe Landscaping

Defensible space is the base around your home that will give firefighters a fighting chance against fire. It means clearing all dry grass, brush and dead leaves at least 30 feet from your home, and at least 150 feet if you’re on a hill.

The key here is “at least.” Your local fire department may ask for greater clearance. Contact them for requirements in your area. Defensible space and a fire safe landscape don’t mean a ring of bare dirt around your home.

How to Enjoy the Outdoors Safely During Fire Season

Keep these 10 tips in mind before you leave home as well as on the trail to make for an enjoyable outdoor experience during fire season!

Living with Fire – Fire Safe Zones

Creating permanent defensible space is a progressive strategy that may take a few years. Each year, steadily remove the overgrown, fire hazardous plants and replace them with fire resistant, well distributed plants. As you begin growing firesafe view screens, for example, you might wait until you have an effective screen before completely removing some of the hazardous plants that currently provide privacy.

Living with Fire – Fuel Reduction

The Sierra Nevada, with their rugged terrain and majestic forests create wonderful views and peaceful living environment. But with the characteristic dry summers they also create extremely severe wildfire conditions.

Living with Fire – Reducing Wildfire Threat

Due to excessive amounts of fuel that have built up in forest, woodlands, and rural subdivisions fire can no longer be allowed to perform its ecological role.

Living with Fire – Series

This series of articles, written by Bill Frost, Past Natural Resource Advisor, UC Cooperative Extension and Mark Hicks, Past Project Manager, El Dorado County Resource Conservation District, is rich with history, tips and advice.

Living with Fire – Vegetation Management

When you’re removing and reducing vegetation, the question that is commonly asked is, “What do I do with all of this debris?” If you are doing things right, you can expect some large debris piles – fire hazards in themselves. There are many options for managing this debris, among them are chipping, burning and pile distribution.