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Hate crime charges added in Asian American store attacks

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BALTIMORE (AP) — A man accused in a rampage at three Baltimore liquor stores owned by Asian American families last month is now facing hate crime charges, prosecutors announced Monday.

Daryl Doles, 50, was already charged with robbery and assault for the attacks, but a 22-count indictment returned Monday includes nine hate-crime counts and multiple attempted murder charges. If convicted of all charges, Doles faces a potential maximum sentence of two life sentences plus 65 years in prison, prosecutors said in a news release.

The violence occurred late on May 2 after Doles was denied entry to one Asian American-owned store because he refused to wear a mask, authorities said. He returned with a two-by-four and attacked the security guard, prosecutors said. The owner took the lumber away and Doles fled.

Prosecutors said Doles then went on to a second Asian American-owned store, where he kicked a display window, knocking down wine bottles. When the owner told Doles not to come back, Doles used a profanity to denounce Chinese people, officials said.

At the third Asian American-owned store, prosecutors said Doles used a concrete block to assault and try to kill two sisters in their 60s. Doles was detained six blocks away and while he sat on the ground he spoke to a man there who asked him why he assaulted the women. According to prosecutors, Doles replied, “They need to go back to their country.”

“What we’ve all borne witness to over the past year is resentment over coronavirus restrictions, which have unleashed a tidal wave of unjustified, vicious assaults against Asian Americans across this nation,” State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby said at a news conference. “This misplaced anger and hatred toward our Asian American community members is disturbing, unacceptable and will not be tolerated in the city of Baltimore.”

Doles’ attorney, Staci Pipkin, told The Baltimore Sun that Doles has suffered from addiction and mental health issues throughout his life. She accused Mosby of elevating the charges because of media attention.

“Unfortunately, we have seen that office overcharge cases on a regular basis simply because they want press attention,” Pipkin said. “There is no new evidence presented since the time that the SAO (state’s attorney’s office) chose to initially charge this as an assault. It was only after this case made the news that these charges were added, increasing the penalties dramatically.”

Mosby’s comments will make it difficult for him to receive a fair trial, Pipkin said.

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